SUFFOLK REIKI

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Does Reiki really work or is it nonsense?


The effectiveness of Reiki, a holistic

therapy that works alongside

conventional medicine and treatments,

has for years had its validity questioned,

however more recently it is gaining new

respect within the medical community.


For years, Reiki and other holistic therapies have been looked upon with contempt by medical associations, practitioners, and scientists. The idea

that the human body was surrounded by an invisible body of “life force energy” was considered nonsense in the west. These “life energy” fields are accepted

in China as Chi or Qi, in Japan as Ki and in India as Prana but outside these countries, as it was immeasurable by traditional research or scientific instruments it was viewed as balderdash.


But now all that is changing.


There has been an increasing amount of serious, in-depth clinical trials on Reiki over recent years and undoubtedly more will follow. At last, new science is beginning to prove that Reiki works. The UK Reiki Federation has gathered over a hundred clinical trials and published articles in a document called “Reiki – The Body of Evidence” which can be downloaded as a PDF copy.


Reiki is used in hospitals in the UK and USA as well as other countries. The short video below explains how Reiki is used not only in hospitals generally but in the operating theatre as well.



Reiki is beginning to be recognised in a wide variety of settings within the UK, including within NHS hospitals such as:


· Southampton University Hospitals NHS, Southampton

· University College London Hospitals NHS, London

· Great Ormond Street Hospital, London

· Newham University Hospital NHS, London

· Aintree University Hospitals NHS, Liverpool and

· South Tees Hospitals NHS, Middlesbrough


Reiki is being offered within these medical settings to:


· patients with stress and mood disorder

· complement conventional cancer treatments

· complement the treatments of endometriosis

· palliative care cancer patients (day care)

· offered by elderly medicine services

· staff as part of a project to offer complementary therapies


Examples of other places Reiki is being offered include:


· Hospices

· Carers Associations

· NHS Occupational Health Departments

· NHS Medical Centres

· Social Services Day Care Centres

· Drug & Alcohol Abuse/Addiction Programmes + Substance Abusers & Families Support Networks

· GP & Dental Practices

· Residential Care and Nursing Homes

· Local Council Health and Harmony Events treating post-natal mothers, Asian Elders, and others

· Brain Injury rehabilitation centres and

· HIV/AIDS organisations’ holistic health and healing centres


As Reiki continues to become a valued therapy for the hospital setting, analytical reporting continues to add to the much-needed pool of evidence that Reiki is indeed a worthy, effective method for facilitating the healing process; one that can contribute to the improvement of patients everywhere and to the improvement of our health care systems.


The Reiki I offer here privately in Sudbury, Suffolk is the same as that offered by the hospitals mentioned above. Like theirs, mine is of a professional standard; I am a Master Teacher and I have full public liability insurance.




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